Climate Impact Lab teams up with Nike on "Move to Zero" campaign by GlobalPolicyLab Member

The Climate Impact Lab is working with Nike to bring to life the effects of rising temperatures on snowboarders, runners, soccer players and other athletes as part of the company’s “Move to Zero” campaign raising awareness through sport about climate change.

The campaign debuted in September with testimonials from tennis player Naomi Osaka, runner Joan Benoit Samuelson and other athletes speaking to how their performance has been personally affected by falling snow levels, more frequent extreme temperature days and overall hotter weather.

Backing up those testimonials are maps using Climate Impact Lab analysis that paint a dramatic picture of a world transformed by climate change - rising maximum temperatures during tennis tournament season throughout the world, a drop in the number of days below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, a spike in days with high temperatures above 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

As Samuelson says in the campaign, “When I’m out running I feel like I’m an environmental barometer for climate change.”

Carleton awarded AAEA Dissertation Award by Solomon Hsiang

Dr. Mantis

Dr. Mantis

Dr. Tamma Carleton has been awarded the Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award from the Agricultural and Applied Economics Association!

Her dissertation examined the effects of climate change on the wellbeing of populations (e.g. effects of extreme heat and crop failure on suicide rates in India), and the extent to which they are able to use resources (e.g. groundwater) to adapt to those changes (sometimes adaptation gaps remain).

Longmate to UC Berkeley PhD Program by Solomon Hsiang

old enough to do research

old enough to do research

We are psyched that Julia Longmate will hanging around Berkeley to pursue her doctoral studies in the Energy Resources Group this coming Fall!

Julia has been a central team member on the Quantitative Sustainable Development Project, developing new methods to measure soil and topography value with econometrics, designing systems for identifying water pollution sources, and modeling nasty smells… We won’t miss Julia as much as Sandy, since we are confident she will come by to visit for the free snacks:) But we are still excited to see what comes next for Julia!

Sum to UCSB Bren PhD Program by Solomon Hsiang

future Dr Sum!

future Dr Sum!

We are very excited for Sandy Sum who will be heading to UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science and Management in the Fall to pursue her doctoral studies!

Sandy has been a core team member on the Quantitative Sustainable Development Project for three years, developing new methods of valuing natural capital, modeling pasture growth econometrically, and developing new approaches for contingent valuation using revealed preferences, among many other things. We will miss her, but are very excited for her next big step!

Publication: measuring effects of geoengineering on agriculture using volcanoes by Solomon Hsiang

Jon ProctorSolomon Hsiang, and coauthors published a study in Nature estimating the effect of solar radiation management (SRM) on global agricultural production. The paper exploits the historical eruption of massive volcanoes that inject sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere to understand the effect of changing light conditions on crop yields. The paper finds that benefits from cooling, the intended effect of SRM, are fully offset by harm to yields via shading. 

Read the study ungated here.

A resource page for the article is here.

Press release here.

Visualization of the stratospheric sulfate aerosols injected into the atmosphere after the eruption of Mt Pinatubo. Each frame is a month. Visualization by Jon Proctor & Solomon Hsiang.

WSJ economics column on mortality costs of climate change by Solomon Hsiang

Greg Ip discussed our research into the global economic costs of excess mortality risk caused by climate change in his recent Wall Street Journal column.

The research covered in the article is output from the Climate Impact Lab, a collaboration between the GPL at Berkeley, EPIC at U Chicago, The Rutgers Earth System Science & Policy Lab, and the Rhodium Group.

Credit: Wall Street Journal

Credit: Wall Street Journal